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I’d like to officially introduce you to the 1.0 release of the Microsoft Azure Management Libraries. The official announcement of the libraries came out a few days ago on the Microsoft Azure Service Updates blog. Update: Jeff Wilcox wrote up am excellent piece introducing the Management Libraries, in which he covers a lot of ground. 

As I was busy travelling and presenting at the //build conference in San Francisco and enjoying my son Gabriel’s 6th birthday, I was a little tied up and unable to get this post out, but it gave me time to shore up a few little things, publish the code, and prepare a surprise for you that I’ll describe below in this post. Let’s just say I wanted to make it as easy as possible for you to get up and running with the 1.0 bits, since I’m so proud of all the work our teams have put into it. This week at the //build/ 2014 conference I presented a session with my buddy Joe Levy on many new automation stack we’ve added to Microsoft Azure. You can watch our //build/ session on Channel 9, which covers all of the topics from the slide image below. Joe and I talked about the Automation Stack in Microsoft Azure, from the SDK Common NuGet package up through the Microsoft Azure Management Libraries for .NET and into PowerShell and how the new Microsoft Azure Automation Service sits atop all of it for true PowerShell-as-a-service automation that you can use for just about anything.

automation-stack

Demonstrating the Management Libraries

My part of the session was primarily focused on how developers can make use of the Management Libraries (MAML, for short) for various scenarios. I’ve created 2 GitHub projects where the code for these demos, and I also have another surprise I’ll discuss later in the post. First, the demos!

Integration Testing

One scenario in which I think MAML has a lot to offer is to enable integration testing. Imagine having a Web Site that talks to a Storage Account to display data to the user in HTML. Pretty common scenario that can have all sorts of problems. Connection string incorrectness, a dead back-end, misconfiguration – you never know what could happen. Good integration tests offer more confidence that “at least the environment is right and everything is configured properly.” This scenario is represented by the code in the MAML Integration Testing code repository. Using xunit tests and MAML together, I was able to automate the entire process of:

  1. Creating a web site
  2. Publishing the web site’s code
  3. Creating a storage account
  4. Getting that storage account’s connection string
  5. Saving data to the storage account that I intend on displaying on the web site
  6. Configuring the web site’s connection string so that it can find the storage account and pull the data for display
  7. Hit the web site and verify it displays the correct information
  8. Delete the storage account
  9. Delete the web site

If this sounds like a common practice for your Microsoft Azure web apps, you might get some value from this demo, as it could streamline your entire process of integration testing. Here’s the best part – if you’re not really an Azure storage person, and your typical scenario involves a non-cloud-hosted ASP.NET web site that talks to SQL Server, you could still make use of MAML for your own integration tests. Simply use the SQL Management Client to fire up a Microsoft Azure SQL Database, insert a few records, and do basically the rest of the integration testing “stuff” but set up your page to read from the database instead of the storage account. Then, whether you’re deploying your production site to Microsoft Azure or not, you can make sure it all works using a scorched-earth testing environment.

Enabling SaaS

Cloud is a great place for software-as-a-service vendors. In typical SaaS situations, a customer can hit a web site, provide some information, and voila’, their newly-customized web site is all ready. The final demonstration I did during the //build/ session was geared towards these sorts of scenarios. In my demo at //build/, I demonstrated this sort of scenario by creating an MVC application I called MiniBlogger, for it generates live MiniBlog sites running in Microsoft Azure. When the user clicks the button, a Web API controller is invoked using JavaScript. The controller code makes a few calls out to the Microsoft Azure REST API using MAML. It first verifies the site name is available and if not, the user is provided a subtle visual cue that their requested site name isn’t available:

image

When the user finds a name they like that’s also not already in use, they can create the site. As the API controller iterates over each step of the process it sends messages to a SignalR Hub (yes, I can work SignalR in anywhere), and the user is provided real-time status on the process of the site being created and deployed.

image

Once the deployment is complete, the site pops up in a new browser, all ready for use. The code for this demo is also on GitHub, so fork it and party.

Get Your Very Own MAML Project Template (the surprise)

In this session I made use of Sayed and Mads’ work on SideWaffle and Template Builder to create a Visual Studio Extension that makes it easy to get up and running with MAML. Sayed and Mads have long thought SideWaffle would be great for coming up with canned presentations, and this was my first attempt at delivering on their goal. I asked them both tons of questions throughout the process, so first and foremost, thanks to them for SideWaffle and their patience as I fumbled through aspects of getting the hang of using it.

You can get the Microsoft Azure Management Libraries extension now in the Visual Studio Extensions Gallery. I’ve also created a little YouTube video demonstrating its usage. In five minutes, you can have a running Console Application that creates Virtual Machines in Microsoft Azure.

This Visual Studio Extension I created contains a few elements. First, it has a project template that references all of the MAML NuGet packages and the Active Directory Authentication Library NuGet package, which are dependencies for the demonstration. When you install the extension you’ll get a new project template like the one highlighted below.

SNAGHTMLae8a6c3

The project is a basic Console Application, but with all the MAML/ADAL NuGets referenced. Also contained within the extension are five item templates and 6 code snippets that walk you through the process of authoring code that will result in the following workflow:

  1. Authenticate to Microsoft Azure using Azure Active Directory
  2. Retrieve a list of Microsoft Azure subscriptions that the authenticated user can access
  3. Find a specific subscription and associate the AAD token with that subscription
  4. Create a new Cloud Service in the subscription
  5. Create a new Storage Account in the subscription
  6. Get the list of Virtual Machine images containing a filter (this is provided in the snippets as a parameter)
  7. Create a Virtual Machine running in the newly-created Cloud Service container, using the VHD of the image selected earlier
  8. Deploy the Virtual Machine and start it up

The screen shot below is from my own instance of Visual Studio testing out the item templates. I’m on step 2 in this screen shot, about to add the class that facilitates the subscription-selection process described above.

SNAGHTMLaf38d3a

Likewise, here’s my code being edited during step 2. Note how the snippet is really doing the work, and the comments provide guidance.

image

Each step of the process is pretty-well documented. I tried really hard to think of the easiest way to help the Microsoft Azure community get up and running with MAML following our 1.0 release, and this extension seemed to be the best answer I could come up with. I hope you find it as helpful as I think you’ll find it, but I welcome any feedback you may have on the extension and how it could be improved. Same thing for MAML – we’re all about taking feedback, so let us know what we can do to make the future better for you as you automate everything in Microsoft Azure.

Congrats to the Team

I’d definitely like to congratulate my team, and all the teams in Microsoft Azure who brought their awesome in full force this year in preparation for //build/. We had some great releases, amazing announcements, and heard great things from the community. Happy coding!

Comments

Comment by Rajat

Hi Brady,

Thanks for the info on the mgmt lib. While working with the REST API , we would get back a ProcessId, which we could query every few seconds, to find out the status. Same thing applies here ?

Rajat
Comment by Bob Hanson

Hi Brady, any suggestions for those of us who used the pre-release example you gave to get it converted to the GA Nu-Get packages? Thanks in advance :)

Bob Hanson
Comment by brady gaster

Rajat - our async methods actually do the polling for you. Our responses all have a "request id" property, that we use during the polling for the long running async operations.

Bob - we tried *very* hard not to create any breaking changes between preview and GA. There may be a few, as we did some late cleaning up with a few naming inconsistencies, but those were very minimal. Just open up your "manage NuGet packages" dialog in VS and do an Update on the packages to pull down the 1.0 bits, and I think you'll be okay. Please let me know if not.

brady gaster
Comment by Steve

Very very interesting stuff and hats off to you for presenting so complete of a walk-thru. Resources like MAML .... would love to extoll the virtues at greater length but gotta go digest some of this stuff.

Please fire up the editor and give us more!

Steve
Comment by brady gaster

Thanks Steve! Appreciate it. We've got more awesome on the way, promise.

brady gaster
Comment by dirksmith

Hi,
I followed your video and code, I got the token from Azure for my subscription but I got this error while createcloudservice function is in execution.

AuthenticationFailed: A security token exception occured for the received JWT token.

I didnt figure out. Kindly help on this.

dirksmith
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