I’ve been asked a lot of great questions about Azure Web Sites since the feature launched in June. Things like on-premise integration, connecting to service bus, and having multiple environments (like staging, production, etc), are all great questions that arise on a pretty regular cadence. With this post, I’m going to kick off a series on solving real-world problems for web site and PaaS owners that will try to address a lot of these questions and concerns. I’ve got a few blog posts in the hopper that will address some of these questions, rather than just cover how certain things are done. Those posts are great and all (and a lot of fun to write), but they don’t answer some real-world, practical questions I’ve been asked this year. Stay tuned to this area of my site, as I’ll be posting these articles over the next few weeks and probably into the new year. As I post each of these solutions I’ll update this post so you have a one-stop shop to go to when you need to solve one of these problems.

Posts in this Series

Multiple Environments with Azure Web Sites
In this post I demonstrate how to have production and staging sites set up for your web site so that you can test your changes in a sandbox site before pushing your production site and potentially causing damage to it (and your reputation). If you’ve wondered how to gate your deployments using Azure Web Sites, this is a good place to start. You’ll learn how to use Azure Web Sites with a GitHub.com repository and some creative branching strategies to maintain multiple environments for a site.

Managing Multiple Azure Web Site Environments using Visual Studio Publishing Profiles
This post takes the same sort of scenario as presented in the first article. Rather than use GitHub.com as a means to executing a series of gated environment deployments it focuses on the awesome features within Visual Studio for web publishing. Specifically, you’ll see how to use publishing profiles to deploy to multiple Azure Web Sites, so that a team of peers responsible for releasing a site can do so without ever needing to leave Visual Studio.

This post also takes a look at the idea of release management and how this solution answers the question of doing proper release management with a cloud-hosted web site. If you’ve wondered how your SDLC could fit in the idea of continuously maintaining a series of environments for gating your releases using Visual Studio’s super-simple publishing features, this is a great place to start.

Connecting Azure Web Sites to On-Premises Databases Using Azure Service Bus
This post introduces the idea creating a hybrid cloud setup using a Azure Web Site and the Azure Service Bus, to demonstrate how a web site hosted in Azure can connect to your on-premises enterprise database. If you’ve been wondering how to save data from your Azure Web Site into your local database but didn’t know how to do it, or if you’re thinking of taking baby steps in your move toward cloud computing, this post could provide some good guidance on how to get started.

Continuous Delivery to Azure Web Sites using TeamCity
My good friend Magnus put together a very extensive and informative blog post on using Azure Web Sites with TeamCity. If you're a CI user, or a TeamCity user, you'll want to check this out, as it is a great recipe for implementing your CI builds against Azure Web Sites. Magnus worked really hard on this blog post and started working on it for his Windows AzureConf talk, and I'm proud to see how it came together for him.

Jim O'Neil's Blog Series on Integrating Azure Web Sites and Notifications
Jim's blog series - part 1, part 2, and part 3 - are great if you're looking into implementing instant messaging with your Azure Web Site. This series is great, and I feel it shows off some amazing potential and adds a whole new dimension to what's possible on the platform. Take a look at these posts, they're quite inspiring.

G. Andrew Duthie’s Series on Back-end Data Services with Windows 8 Applications
The @devhammer himself has created an awesome series on putting your data in the cloud, so your Windows 8 applications have a common place from which to pull the data. In this series, he discusses how to use Azure Web Sites to create an API that can be called by a Windows 8 application. If you’re delving into Windows 8 development and have been wondering how you could use Web Sites to create the APIs you’ll be calling, this series is a must-read.

Maarten Balliauw on Configuring IIS Methods for ASP.NET Web API with Azure Web Sites
My good friend and dedicated MVP Maarten just wrote up a great post on configuring IIS within Azure Web Sites to support additional HTTP methods like HEAD and PATCH using configuration files. If you’re trying to do some deeper Web API functionality and have struggled with getting these types of HTTP methods supported, this could solve your problem.

Branches, Team Foundation Services, and Azure Web Sites
Wouter de Kort covers how to achieve the multiple-environment approach using Team Foundation Services online. If you're using TFS and you want to set up multiple branches that deploy to a variety of web sites, this article will help you get going. This is a great introduction to using TFS for multiple branches with Azure Web Sites.